FAQs / Questions that people ask

The answers to these and other FAQs can be found on the website under the relevant tab, or by clicking on the links provided here.

Q.  Where is Snowdon, and how do I get there?
A.   It’s in north-west Wales, in the Snowdonia National Park.  See more here.

Q.  Doesn’t Snowdon have another name?
A.  Yes, ‘Yr Wyddfa’ (pronounced uhr-with-va) as we call it in Welsh.  See more here.

Q.  What’s the difference between Snowdon and Snowdonia?
A.   Snowdon (Yr Wyddfa) is the mountain, Snowdonia (Eryri) is the whole National Park.  See more here.

Q.  How high is Snowdon?
A.  It’s 1,085m / 3,560 ft high (though some of the paths start as high up as 350m / 1,150ft).  See more here.

Q. Is Snowdon the highest mountain in the UK?
A. No, there are many higher mountains in Scotland, but it’s the highest south of the border.   See more here about why Snowdon is so popular.

Q.  Is there more than one path to the summit?
A.  Yes, there are 6 main paths.  See more here.

Q.  Is Snowdon suitable for beginners/novices?
A.  Yes, if you choose your path and are suitably prepared.  See our page for beginners or first-timers.

Q.  People talk about ‘climbing’ Snowdon. Is it really a climb – or just a steep walk?
A.  All the main paths are walks – albeit steep at times – but you may briefly need hands in one or two places on some of the paths. Compare them here.


Q.  Which path is easiest?
A.  The Llanberis Path is regardest as the easiest.  See more here.

Q.  Which path is best?
A.  That’s a rather subjective question – every path is someone’s favourite!  See more here.

Q.  Which path is the shortest and quickest?
A.  The Pyg Track, though it’s by no means the easiest.  See more here.

Q.  When is the best time to go up Snowdon?
A.  Weatherwise, we’d recommend from mid-April to September.  See more here.

Q.  Which path is the most scenic and has the best views?
A.  In some ways the easiest paths tend to be the least scenic and dramatic, but they all offer excellent views as they get higher.  See more here.

Q.  It is possible to preview the paths up Snowdon?
A.  Yes!  The Google Trekker (the portable version of Streetmap) has gone up all the main paths, so you can walk the paths ‘virtually’. See more here.

Q.  How many miles is the walk up Snowdon?
A.   It varies between about 3½ and 4½ miles, depending on which path you take (that’s just one way). See more here.

Q.  How fit do I need to be to walk up Snowdon?
A.   You only need to be averagely fit, but in good health.  See more here.

Q.  How long does it take to go up and down Snowdon?
A.   Between 3½ and 8 hours, depending on which path you take, your pace and fitness, and what rest breaks are taken.  See more here.

Q.  Are the paths easy to follow?
A.  They’re well defined, so in good visibility, yes.   See more here.

Q.  Do I need a map and map-reading skills?
A.  The paths are well defined so in good conditions you probably won’t need a map, but it’s wise to have one, just in case the unexpected happens.  See more here.

Q.  Is it feasible to go up one path and down another?
A.  Yes, certain combinations are commonly done.  See more here.

Q.  Can we just turn up, or do we need to book?
A.  The paths on Snowdon are open 24/7, and there is no access fee. See more here. You can’t book to walk up Snowdon, and with the exception of Pen y Pass, you can’t pre-book parking either.  See more about parking here.

Q.  Are there places to have a picnic other than at the summit?
A.  Yes, it’s easy enough to find places, though it’s not so pleasant in poor weather.  See more here.

Q.  Is walking up Snowdon dangerous?
A.  Not in good conditions, if you’re sensible and prepared, but accidents can happen to anyone, and some paths could be considered safer than others.  See more here.

Q.  What should I wear (especially on my feet), and what kit do I need to take?
A.  It will somewhat depend on the season and the weather.  See more here.

Q.  Are walking poles a sensible thing to take?
A.  If you usually walk with poles, then you’ll definitely appreciate them on Snowdon.  See more here.

Q.  Where do I park for Snowdon?
A.  The various paths have their designated car parks, and there is also a Park & Ride service.  See more about parking here.

Q.  Do I need to book to park?
A.  Only if you’re planning on parking at Pen y Pass in the season. This is the most expensive option, if you choose it.  See more about parking here.

Q.  I’ve heard there’s a cheap Park & Ride service. Where’s that?
A.  At Nant Peris, between Llanberis and Pen y Pass.  See more here.

Q.  Can I use a bus to get to different paths?
A.  Yes, the Sherpa bus service connects the various paths.  See more here.

Q.  Is there a charge to go up Snowdon?
A.  No. Snowdon and Eryri (Snowdonia) are completely free for walkers. The paths up Snowdon follow public Rights of Way.

Q.  Is there phone reception on Snowdon?
A.  Yes, but only in some places.  See more here.

Q.  Will the café and toilets be open at the summit?
A.  No, not this year (2022).  See more here.

Q.  If the weather is poor, am I allowed to eat my packed lunch in the summit building?
A.  Yes, though it’s not open this year (2022). See more here.

Q.  Can I take the train down if I don’t want to walk back down?
A.  Only if they’re running and there’s room.  See more here.

Q.  Is Snowdon suitable for children?
A.  For the most part, yes, though it depends on their ability.  See more here.

Q.  Can I take a dog up Snowdon?
A.  Yes, if it’s under close control.  See more here.

Q.  Can I ride my bike on the bridleways on Snowdon?
A.  Yes, though there are restrictions from May to September.  See more here.

Q.  Where can I get an accurate weather forecast for Snowdon?
A.  There are several useful websites.  See more here.

Q.  Should I cancel if the weather forecast is really bad?
A.  You probably won’t enjoy it if the weather’s bad, and certain bad weather can prove dangerous. Postpone, rather than cancel, and come back another time. See more here.

Q.  Is Snowdon ever closed because of bad weather?
A.  No, the paths are public Rights of Way, so open 24/7, but that doesn’t mean it’s necessarily safe to go up. See more here.

Q.  Is it wise to walk up Snowdon in winter?
A.  This will depend on the conditions, which are often unpredictable, and how prepared and experienced you are. See more here.

Q.  Will Snowdon be busy, and will there be a queue at the top?
A.  The busiest times are at weekends and Bank Holidays.  See more here.

Q.  What time should I set off to catch the sunrise?
A.  That’ll depend on the time of year.  See more here.

Q.  Are there other paths on Snowdon besides the main six ways up?
A.  Yes there are, though they’re best left to experienced walkers.  See more here.

Q.  Is camping allowed on Snowdon?
A.   No, not on the mountain itself, because it’s private land.  See more here.

Q.  Are barbecues allowed on Snowdon?
A.  No, you would not get permission from the landowner to have a BBQ.  See more here.

Q.  Where can we stay near Snowdon?
A.  There are lots of options as regards accommodation.  See more here.

Q.  Where can we eat and drink near Snowdon?
A.  There are lots of options.  See more here.

Q.  Is it safe for me to go up Snowdon on my own?
A.  Generally speaking, yes, if you take basic precautions.  See more here.

Q.  Can we bring a large group of people to walk up Snowdon?
A.  Yes, but it will bring extra considerations.  See more here.

Q.  What happens if someone in our group has an accident?
A.  You may need to call for help.  See more here.

Q.  I lost something on Snowdon. Where might it have been handed in?
A.  Lost property is kept at the Wardens’ office at Pen y Pass (01286 872555).

Q.  Can I leave a memorial to a loved one at the summit, or scatter ashes?
A.  The National Park Authority requests that memorials are not left, and that ashes are not scattered on Snowdon.  See more here.

Q.  Can I fly a drone on Snowdon?
A.   No, not without permission from the landowner. You can read more about the Park’s policy here.

Q.  I enjoyed my day on Snowdon. Can I make a donation to maintaining the paths?
A.  Certainly, and thank you.  See more here.


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